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Research

The Office of Research provides support, liaison and guidance for all clinical, basic and student research efforts. The office directs the maintenance and running of laboratories, and submits and manages intra- and extramural grant submissions. The school's biomedical research focuses on the craniofacies with emphasis on normal and abnormal development, nonsyndromic oral clefts, tooth agenesis, oral carcinogenesis, mucosal immunity, autoimmunity, molecular imaging of cancer, biomaterials, biomarker discovery, pathogenesis of periodontal disease, and tissue regeneration.

The School of Dentistry's location in the Texas Medical Center provides unparalleled opportunities for collaboration with local, national and international research partners. The integration with the Center for Clinical and Translational Sciences (CCTS) provides exceptional resources for planning clinical trials, biostatistics, bioethics, epidemiology, and core facilities for various types of biological assays. The school's state-of-the-art biomedical research laboratories are located in the UT Behavioral & Biomedical Sciences Building, which is connected to the School of Dentistry. 

Funding Infographic

Faculty


UTHealth School of Dentistry's Office of Research provides support, liaison and guidance for all clinical, basic and faculty research efforts.

 

Centers


The School of Dentistry houses the Center for Craniofacial Research (CCR) and the Houston Center for Biomaterials and Biomimetics (HCBB).

 

Students


The Student Research Group (SRG) promotes, supports, and nurtures the interests of dental student researchers during their time at the school.

 


Faculty Research Areas of Interest

  • Biomaterials & Dental Materials

    Dr. Badger is testing a new luting agent from NuSmile. The agent will be tested for shear strength on extracted tooth dentin and compared with RelyX and Multilink. Differing preparation procedures will be used to determine the best method.

    Dr. Farach-Carson’s laboratory uses three dimensional models to study the behavior of both cancer cells and normal cells. The Farach-Carson laboratory uses our understanding of extracellular matrix to create “smart” biomaterials that can mimic the native tissue to provide an environment in which to study cell and tissue behavior under physiologically relevant conditions. We partner with the Houston Center for Biomaterials and Biomimetics (HCBB) to create and study these biologically based materials.

    Dr. Frey’s research focuses on biomaterials, especially durability and esthetic qualities of dental prosthetics and bonding materials. He has emphasized Pedodontic crowns and various wear, fracture, and cementation studies. He also researches in the study of wear on different enamels (primary and permanent) upon itself and various crown materials. His most recent studies involve gloss, roughness, and their interdependence.

    Dr. Harrington has an interest in using biomaterials as tools to expand our knowledge of cellular processes, and improve our ability to impact human health. His projects have spanned applications of soft, biocompatible hydrogels, degradable lactide/glycolide polymeric scaffolds, and self-assembling peptide nanostructures for regenerative medicine. His laboratory’s recent projects involve tissue engineering of the salivary gland as a post-radiotherapy treatment for xerostomia, and “tumor engineering” to study mechanisms of oral cancer and prostate cancer in unique 3D models, adapted to high-throughput screening. By customizing matrices and manufacturing techniques, we design biomimetic solutions that address needs at the cell, tissue, and organ level.

    Dr. Ontiveros’ research focuses on in vitro mechanical properties of dental materials; light polymerization; adhesion; ceramic; resin composite; color/optical properties and esthetics. Clinical investigations focus around current techniques related to tooth whitening and other appearance related studies. 

    Dr. Kasper’s research applies fundamentals of engineering, materials science, and the biosciences toward the development and evaluation of biomaterial-based technologies to meet clinical needs. Current research interests include the application of engineered culture conditions for the development of bioactive constructs for craniofacial and orthopedic tissue regeneration. Additional research focuses on applications of 3D printing and digital technologies in dentistry.

    Dr. Kiat-amnuay's research focuses on the areas of maxillofacial prosthetic and prosthodontics. Her team has investigated color stability and mechanical properties of pigmented maxillofacial prosthetic elastomers subjected to artificial/natural weathering and microwave energy. The goal is to find the best combinations of silicone/pigment/opacifier used to make facial prostheses last longer. Several in vivo studies were also performed on adhesive retention of maxillofacial prostheses. In addition, randomized controlled crossover clinical trials related to maxillofacial prosthetic and implant dentistry were conducted to improve patients’ quality of lives. Her group has also studied cement bond strengths of implant-supported ceramic crowns on custom ceramic abutments.

  • Craniofacial

    Dr. Chiquet’s research focuses on studying the genetics of craniofacial development, with emphasis on cleft lip and palate.  He has shown that the CRISPLD2 gene has been shown to be associated with nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and critical for normal palate and jaw formation in zebrafish.  Pathway analysis is underway testing for association with differentially regulated genes in the presence or absence of CRISPLD2 in zebrafish. Additionally, his lab is looking at a known pathway of development, the β-catenin mediated WNT pathway, to determine if these genes are involved in clefting etiology.  Other ongoing projects include (1) studying genetic modifiers of cleft lip and palate phenotype, (2) evaluating the microbiome of patients born with cleft lip and palate, (3) analyzing dental materials used in presurgical appliance therapy for children born with cleft lip and palate, and (4) minimizing exposure of general anesthesia for children undergoing dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia.

    Dr. Fakhouri’s research interests focus on identifying epigenetic and genetic factors that cause and contribute to increase the risk of craniofacial disorders including cleft lip and palate, craniosynostosis and micrognathia. His lab uses mouse models and organ cultures to delineate the molecular mechanism of a novel genetic interaction between two transcription factors, IRF6 and TWIST1, that plays a critical role in regulating the epithelial-mesenchymal interaction during oral, facial and skull development. Using biochemical and genetic approaches, his lab investigates how mutations in TWIST1 phospho-sites disrupt formation of craniofacial tissues derived from mesenchymal cells. Integration of experimental data and bioinformatics for developing computational models are also utilized in Fakhouri’s lab to identify etiologic non-coding DNA variants associated with cancer diseases including head and neck squamous carcinoma. The overall goal of his lab research is to translate their bench findings into the clinic to improve risk assessment and pave the way to personalized medicine.

    Dr. Hecht has two research focuses. Genes contributing to nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate are identified using next generation sequencing in a family-based approach, and then functionally tested in zebrafish. This approach has successfully identified genes that are now being modeled in mice. In our cartilage biology studies, a DOX-inducible mouse (MT-COMP) with the common COMP mutation was used to delineate the chondrocyte-specific mechanisms causing the dwarfing condition, pseudoachondroplasia. We have successfully tested different treatments in the MT-COMP mouse, which partially rescued the short limb phenotype.

    Dr. Iwata’s research focuses on understanding mechanisms that cause craniofacial birth defects and oral diseases. His group is trying to determine the roles of 1) exocytosis and autophagy, 2) non-coding RNAs, 3) cellular cholesterol metabolism, and 4) WNT signaling pathway in craniofacial development and homeostasis. They have generated new genetic mouse models and has been characterizing the molecular mechanism using multidisciplinary approaches including genetics, genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics. His group seek to identify novel targets for new therapeutics and new diagnostic tools for identifying defects and diseases in at risk populations.

    Dr. Kasper’s research applies fundamentals of engineering, materials science, and the biosciences toward the development and evaluation of biomaterial-based technologies to meet clinical needs. Current research interests include the application of engineered culture conditions for the development of bioactive constructs for craniofacial and orthopedic tissue regeneration. Additional research focuses on applications of 3D printing and digital technologies in dentistry.

    Dr. Letra’s research focuses on identifying genetic variants contributing to complex oral traits including craniofacial anomalies and oral inflammatory conditions. Her group is currently working on gene discovery studies of cleft lip/palate, dental anomalies, and periapical disease in humans, and further exploring the role of identified genes in cells and/or animal models of these conditions. More recently, her research has started exploring potential correlations between craniofacial anomalies and cancer, as well as oral health-systemic health correlations.

    Dr. Silva’s research focuses on two distinct projects delineating the genetics of craniofacial anomalies and genetic susceptibility of periapical disease (a chronic inflammatory process associated with bone loss in the jaws). We are testing the hypothesis that cancer and congenital malformations have a common etiology. Preliminary data from this project showed association between several types of cancer, in particular colon cancer, in individuals/families with craniofacial anomalies such as tooth agenesis and cleft lip and palate. Gene discovery studies suggested AXIN2, a negative regulator of the WNT pathway, as a potential candidate gene for nonsyndromic oral clefts.

    Dr. Wong has two major research interests. Within the AFIRM consortium, his project focuses on the management of severe maxillofacial injuries through a series of therapeutic interventions. First, preservation of skeletal space is accomplished with a drug-eluting methylmethacrylate polymer. This is followed by the generation of customized vascularized bone grafts formed in a distant site and subsequently transferred into the traumatic defect. His second research focus involves the characterization of TMJ disease and the regeneration of the disc and condyle using tissue engineering principles.

  • Dental Public Health

    Dr. Badger is testing a new luting agent from NuSmile. The agent will be tested for shear strength on extracted tooth dentin and compared with RelyX and Multilink. Differing preparation procedures will be used to determine the best method.

    Dr. Jeter focuses on the intersection of dentistry and neurology, aiming to understand and address the unique oral health needs of neurodegenerative diseases. By profiling the oral microbiome and inflammatory markers in body fluids (e.g., blood, cerebrospinal fluid), Dr. Jeter investigates a possible molecular link between periodontal disease and Alzheimer’s disease.  For Parkinson’s disease, her lab has projects within coordination of care, the oral microbiome, and causes of patient drooling, dysphagia, and oral hygiene complications. 

    Dr. Neumann's research interest is on the improvement of oral health at a population level. She currently serves as Co-Investigator on two funded NIH/NIDCR projects: a) “CATCH Healthy Smiles: Planning and feasibility of an elementary school-based child oral health RCT” in collaboration with the School of Public Health and the CATCH study team (PI: S. Sharma) and b) “Implementing Dental Quality Measures in Practice” (PI: M. Walji). She is also actively involved in the various applications of Caries Management by Risk Assessment (CAMBRA) and interprofessional initiatives.

    Dr Walji's research interests are focused on using informatics approaches to improve the safety and quality of oral healthcare, with a particular focus on electronic health records. He currently serves as a Principal Investigator of two NIH/NIDCR funded studies 1) “Developing a Patient Safety System for Dentistry” and 2) Implementing Dental Quality Measures in Practice. He also serves as a PI on an AHRQ funded study titled “Measuring Occurrence of and Disparities in Dental Clinic Adverse Events”. He has provided informatics expertise in the development and maintenance of the Dental Diagnostic System (DDS) which serves as a collection of specific dental terms that is designed for the purposes of dental diagnosis documentation. He also leads a multi-institutional team that has developed the BigMouth Dental Data Repository, which currently contains data on over 2 million patients derived from EHRs from 6 dental institutions.

  • Immunology

    Dr. Chun-Teh Lee’s research interests focus on understanding inflammation resolution and host-microbiome interactions in periodontitis. Specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators (SPMs), including lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and maresins, induce resolution of inflammation in inflammatory diseases. Treatment of experimental periodontitis with SPMs results in disease reversal and periodontal regeneration. Currently, his research project aims to determine the clinical SPM profile and associated microbiota in periodontitis.

    Dr. Klein’s has two primary areas of research. The first is aimed at understanding the involvement of a novel immune system derived splice variant of thyroid stimulating hormone in the development and/or perpetuation of autoimmune thyroiditis, and as a regulator of host metabolic activity.  Various targeted knockdown systems are being applied in these studies.  In a second area of research, Dr. Klein is exploring factors that regulate the adaptive and innate immune responses in mucosal sites, particularly in the intestine and the oral cavity.  

    Dr. Lakschevitz’s research uses the oral cavity as a model to study inflammation. She developed a method using high-throughput screening (HTS) flow cytometry to understand changes in the neutrophil cell surface signature. She hypothesizes that neutrophils can be polarized into a hyperactive subset when there is a pre-existing low-grade inflammatory process, resulting in an altered neutrophil phenotype that might impact their ability to perform key neutrophil functions. Currently, her research focuses in immunophenotyping neutrophils both in humans and in animal models to identify and characterize these subsets. Characterization of neutrophils can potentially be used to identify biomarkers for inflammatory diseases.

    Dr. Lou’s research related to roles of immune cells and molecules in autoimmune diseases and tissue aging. His group developed a unique rat model and discovered a novel immune cell called antigen-presenting NK cell. They are current examining how this novel cell controls autoimmune disease.  His team is also examining how immune molecules such as cytokines regulate physiological process such as aging and tissue remodeling.  They have identified a cytokine interleukin33 to be critical in rejuvenation of aged neurons in brains in a special mouse model; deficiency of this molecule causes neurodegeneration in the old animals. Currently, they are investigating whether interleukin33 deficiency is a causes of human elderly dementias such as Alzheimer’s disease.    

    Dr. Schaefer’s research focuses on the mucosal immune system: its development and role in maintaining mucosal homeostasis. Our studies aim to uncover the regulatory mechanisms involved in controlling intestinal immunity and inflammation and how disruptions in these processes lead to chronic disease. We have identified Roquin-1, an RNA binding protein, as a critical modulator of inflammation. Studies are underway to define the mechanism by which Roquin-1 shapes the immune response. The contribution of epigenetics, including non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and DNA modifications, is being studied to identify key target genes that can be exploited for diagnosing or treating inflammation.

    Dr. Ransome van der Hoeven’s research focuses on understanding the mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions. The major areas of our current research are: 1) To elucidate innate immune defense mechanisms in response to oral and systemic pathogens using a simple invertebrate model Caenorhabditis elegans, and 2) To determine how Enterococcus faecalis an opportunistic pathogen is able to persist and cause secondary endodontic infections.

  • Oral Cancers & Cancer Therapy

    Dr. Farach-Carson’s research relates to the role of extracellular matrix in progression of cancer following metastasis from primary sites, such as prostate or oral cavity, to bone. Primary tumors are slow growing and are not life-threatening until they form tumors in bone. Factors sequestered in bone matrix provide a rich environment to promote growth of invading cancer cells. Many factors are bound to proteoglycans, including perlecan/HSPG2, that contain heparan sulfate that regulate their bioactivity. We seek to identify factors responsible for cancer growth and progression with the long term aim of developing "molecular drugs" to combat cancer metastasis.

    Dr. Harrington has an interest in using biomaterials as tools to expand our knowledge of cellular processes, and improve our ability to impact human health. His projects have spanned applications of soft, biocompatible hydrogels, degradable lactide/glycolide polymeric scaffolds, and self-assembling peptide nanostructures for regenerative medicine. His laboratory’s recent projects involve tissue engineering of the salivary gland as a post-radiotherapy treatment for xerostomia, and “tumor engineering” to study mechanisms of oral cancer and prostate cancer in unique 3D models, adapted to high-throughput screening. By customizing matrices and manufacturing techniques, we design biomimetic solutions that address needs at the cell, tissue, and organ level.

    Dr. Ogbureke’s research involves investigating the role of the family of glycophosphoproteins comprising osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) - small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs)- in biology of oral cancer and other head and neck cancers. These proteins have key functional roles during malignant transformation, invasion and metastasis, and may potentially be used as diagnostic and prognostic tools, as well as targets for therapeutic intervention. Some of the SIBLING family of proteins may therefore identify patients who could benefit from more extensive surgical resection, or from adjunct treatments such as radiotherapy for primary OSCCs. Dissecting the functional and mechanistic pathways of SIBLING activity in oral cancer as well as investigating the interaction of BSP and DSPP with the HPV16 oncoproteins (E6/E7) in the biology of HPV-associated oral cancers are ongoing projects.

    Dr. Dharini van der Hoeven’s research focuses on identification of novel anti-cancer therapeutics for the treatment of oral squamous cell carcinomas. Our studies target the EGFR-Ras signaling pathway which is overactive in most oral squamous cell carcinomas. Current research interests include identification of novel, indirect inhibitors of EGFR and Ras which perturb their function through altering plasma membrane topology, extensive characterization of such compounds in cellular signaling and functional studies, pre-clinical development and chemical optimization of compounds with the overall aim of identifying advanced drug candidates.

    Dr. Vigneswaran’s group focus on clinical and laboratory-based research related to oral cancer and its precursors. His clinical research focuses on the use non-invasive optical imaging and quantitative cytology for monitoring of the progression of oral premalignant lesions. His basic research involves the development of experimental animal models of oral cancer for pre-clinical testing of molecular targeted diagnostic imaging and therapy.

    Dr. Young’s research involves the development and characterization of biomaterials-based platform technologies focused in two areas: immunotherapy and craniofacial tissue regeneration. With respect to the treatment of oral cancer, our lab has been working on injectable cancer vaccine systems which act as sites for in situ dendritic cell programming. By leveraging our knowledge of bioengineering technologies for cell recruitment and differentiation, we have been able to translate these fundamental strategies to the cancer immunotherapy setting. Our goal is to examine the efficacy of these vaccine systems in the context of oral squamous cell carcinoma, and explore any synergies that may arise from the use of cancer vaccines and other forms of immunotherapy. The concept of in situ cell programming is also utilized in our tissue regeneration projects where we are exploring the use of various hydrogels and layer-by-layer polymer coating technologies to promote nerve and bone regeneration in several challenging preclinical models.

  • Oral Microbiome

    Dr. Angelov’s research focus encompasses basic, clinical and translational studies, mainly in the area of oral mucosal wound healing, periodontal microbiology and dental implants. More recently, a focus of the collaborative research efforts of our department and Baylor’s College of Medicine has been the role of oral bacteria in blood pressure regulation via the Nitrate-Nitrite-Nitric Oxide Pathway. The goal is to understand the role of human microbial communities in the host’s NO homeostasis, to allow the development of new diagnostics and other approaches to manipulate these microbial communities to promote human health and prevent disease.

    Dr. Jeter focuses on the intersection of dentistry and neurology, aiming to understand and address the unique oral health needs of neurodegenerative diseases. By profiling the oral microbiome and inflammatory markers in body fluids (e.g., blood, cerebrospinal fluid), Dr. Jeter investigates a possible molecular link between periodontal disease and Alzheimer’s disease.  For Parkinson’s disease, her lab has projects within coordination of care, the oral microbiome, and causes of patient drooling, dysphagia, and oral hygiene complications. 

    Dr. Tribble’s research focuses on two groups of anaerobic bacteria associated with periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella spp. In particular, she investigates the molecular mechanisms of horizontal DNA transfer in oral microbial communities, and the biological consequences of gene exchange. Her research objectives are to improve our understanding of the role of DNA exchange as it contributes to bacterial survival and persistence in the host, and adaptive evolution transitioning microbiome- host interactions from commensal to pathogenic.

    Dr. Wang has focused her research on oral infectious diseases such as periodontal diseases and dental caries. Using molecular genetics approach, we are deciphering the mechanisms of interferences of Streptococcus mutans quorum sensing by other oral bacteria. We are also investigating the role of bacterial interspecies interactions in racial discrepancies in periodontitis. We, in collaboration with Dr. Hua Xie, have demonstrated that Streptococcus cristatus (an oral commensal) inhibited the colonization of Porphyromonas gingivalis (a periodontal pathogen) in vitro and in vivo. The long-term goal of our research is to target certain pathogens specifically for prevention of common oral infectious diseases.

  • Tissue Regeneration

    Dr. Eswaran’s primary research focus is hard and soft tissue regeneration. He is also involved in educational and health outcomes research pertaining to the field of periodontology and implant dentistry. His current study involves utilizing Platelet Rich Fibrin (PRF) in extraction sockets and evaluating its efficacy in bone regeneration and maintenance of alveolar ridge width for implant placement. His educational research focuses on faculty calibration. In particular, he investigates the variations in periodontal diagnosis and calculus detection among faculties in the clinic. The study also involves problem centered calibration techniques to enhance the reliability and consistency among faculties in teaching students.

    Dr. Farach-Carson’s laboratory uses proteoglycans, particularly those bearing heparan sulfate chains such as perlecan, in engineering of complex tissues such as bone, cartilage or salivary gland. Cell and molecular engineering strategies are being developed that facilitate controlled tissue growth and differentiation. Growth factor binding and delivery by engineered proteoglycans are used in oral surgery and orthopaedic applications. Engineering partnerships support these studies. We use a variety of techniques including 3D hydrogel cell culture, recombinant and natural protein purification and analysis, cloning and molecular biology, immunodetection, 3D printing, confocal imaging and pre-clinical models.

    Dr. Harrington has an interest in using biomaterials as tools to expand our knowledge of cellular processes, and improve our ability to impact human health. His projects have spanned applications of soft, biocompatible hydrogels, degradable lactide/glycolide polymeric scaffolds, and self-assembling peptide nanostructures for regenerative medicine. His laboratory’s recent projects involve tissue engineering of the salivary gland as a post-radiotherapy treatment for xerostomia, and “tumor engineering” to study mechanisms of oral cancer and prostate cancer in unique 3D models, adapted to high-throughput screening. By customizing matrices and manufacturing techniques, we design biomimetic solutions that address needs at the cell, tissue, and organ level.

    Dr. Kasper’s research applies fundamentals of engineering, materials science, and the biosciences toward the development and evaluation of biomaterial-based technologies to meet clinical needs. Current research interests include the application of engineered culture conditions for the development of bioactive constructs for craniofacial and orthopedic tissue regeneration. Additional research focuses on applications of 3D printing and digital technologies in dentistry.

    Dr. Weltman’s research focuses on a broad scope of disciplines including laser dentistry, re-generation, microbiology, implant dentistry, cone beam computed tomography, microscopy, periodontal-systemic disease correlations, and dental education. Her expertise is in conducting clinical trials, but has enjoyed working with basic science colleagues to trans-late basic science outcomes into clinical applications. She has received funding for the research projects through industry and research scholarships.

    Dr. Wong has two major research interests. Within the AFIRM consortium, his project focuses on the management of severe maxillofacial injuries through a series of therapeutic interventions. First, preservation of skeletal space is accomplished with a drug-eluting methylmethacrylate polymer. This is followed by the generation of customized vascularized bone grafts formed in a distant site and subsequently transferred into the traumatic defect. His second research focus involves the characterization of TMJ disease and the regeneration of the disc and condyle using tissue engineering principles.

Center for Craniofacial Research

The CCR’s mission is to lead cutting-edge research to identify,understand, prevent and treat craniofacial disorders. The CCR is under the direction of nationally recognized geneticist Jacqueline T. Hecht, PhD, MS, professor and associate dean for research at the UTHealth School of Dentistry, and director of the Pediatric Research Center at the UTHealth Medical School.



Center for Craniofacial Research

Jacqueline T. Hecht, PhD, MS

HCBB

Houston Center for Biomaterials and Biomimetics

Biomaterial preparation

UTHealth School of Dentistry is home to the Houston Center for Biomaterials and Biomimetics. The HCBB seeks to become a comprehensive, world-class research and development center of excellence for biomaterials and biomimetics, and a synergistic force in increasing the scholarship of discovery, integration of knowledge within and between disciplines, teaching, and application.

The HCBB provides leadership and support in the development of new scientific discoveries, professional collaborations and teaching creativity, based on support from federal agencies, private industry and other sources. The HCBB also provides expertise in the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of new clinical and educational technologies.

Houston Chapter AADR Logo

The Houston Section has been established to promote the mission and objectives of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) on a local level, in abidance with the rules and regulations of that organization. The foremost purpose of this Section is to encourage research collaboration, support, and represent the oral health research community of Houston with the goal of contributing to the advancement of oral health worldwide.

Student Research

The Student Research Group (SRG) at UTHealth School of Dentistry is composed of dental students interested in scientific inquiry. It is a local chapter of the American Association of Dental Research’s National Student Research Group and is a student-run organization guided by input from a faculty advisor (Dr. Gena Tribble, student research coordinator). The SRG promotes, supports and nurtures the interests of dental student researchers during their time at the school. It provides exposure to the diverse types of research in the dental profession and encourages involvement in research activities at the School of Dentistry by making students aware of research opportunities, such as the Summer Research Program and research electives. The group’s goals are accomplished in part by hosting monthly meetings where School of Dentistry professors and students present their research.

UTHealth School of Dentistry has a long history of strong student participation in local and national scientific research meetings such as the annual Star of the South, American Association of Dental Research and Hinman Student Research Symposium, where students have presented abstracts and platform presentations. Many students are co-authors of peer-reviewed papers. Student participants have indicated that these activities translate into enhanced critical-thinking skills which strengthen clinical diagnostic skills thereby helping UTHealth graduates become better health-care providers.

Student Research Group 2017 - 2018

Vice President

Secretary/Historian

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